At Thompson’s we would like to reassure all our clients that as far as possible we are operating as normal. The health and safety of our staff and clients is our primary concern during this outbreak and as such we are reviewing the situation on a regular basis and will be adapting our working practices following government guidelines. However, we have had to make some minor changes to how we are doing things.

Following Government guidelines, we have temporarily closed all of our offices and our staff are now all working from home using secure technologies to ensure they are able to continue to progress with existing and new cases as normal. All face to face meetings have been cancelled, however we are continuing to hold these meetings via phone and video calls. All the team are contactable on their direct dial numbers and email should you need to speak with your solicitor, please do not hesitate to talk to us about anything during this time.

We know these are uncertain and unsettling times for many of our clients, and the wider population, and things might look a little different for the foreseeable future. But our focus remains on our dedication, knowledge and strength that we provide to all our clients. We will continue to provide updates over the coming days and weeks in accordance with official guidelines and to keep everyone informed of the situation.

As always, for any concerns, advice and updates on your case; Talk to Thompsons.

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Welcome To Our Blog

This will be the place to find all breaking news and updates from Thompsons and personal injury litigation in general.

The Scottish legal system is in a state of flux at the moment with a number of changes under discussion which could radically affect your freedom to go to court to settle a dispute, a grievance, or to defend your rights.

The most worrying, and arguably the one the man in the street knows least about, is a proposal to make you and I bear the total cost of our civil court system.

One of the side effects of the recession is that workers feel so insecure about their employment prospects that many of them are reluctant to report accidents at work, industrial or otherwise.

I increasingly hear stories of workers being left injured, scarred or disabled to some extent by accidents that have happened over the last few years, as the economy slowed and workplace safety lost priority.

Just the other week a large company in the West of Scotland closed its doors and turned its back on its employees.  Very little was known by its workers until the last minute. Indeed many turned up only to be faced with locked gates and doors.

Employment law protects workers’ rights, and when a company is wound up in normal circumstances the staff should be consulted and they have a right to redundancy pay.

Occasionally the media bend the idea of raising personal injury claims into something seedy.  The tag line “compensation culture” is banded about and Solicitors are vilified for the part they play.

One such example is the case of Gillian Chapmen.  Gillian’s husband died of mesothelioma, a terminable cancer occurring from exposure to asbestos.

Much of my work in obtaining compensation for victims centres around those with diseases, be it industrial, hospital associated or blood-borne.

One of my longer term campaigns is for those who were contaminated with Hepatitis C through defective blood products while in hospital. 

I don’t get much time for TV but when I do I love a chat show.  My favourite was Michael Parkinson, a real old-fashioned gent and excellent journalist.  It hasn’t been the same since he has been gone – Jonathon Ross and Pierce Morgan couldn’t lace his boots!

It saddened me last year when Sir. Michael was accused by the Daily Mail of lying in his autobiography when he said he had a happy and harmonious upbringing.  The Mail also accused Parkinson of acting in a “grossly insensitive” way to hi Uncle, Bernard Parkinson.

It’s that time of year when the financial cobwebs of Christmas are being blown away and the pennies are counted and stacked with a view to booking a summer holiday.

Last year, more than any year in the recent past, would-be holiday makers had their plans ruined as firms such as Zoom Airlines, XL Airlines and FlyGlobespan went bust, stranding passengers around the globe and leaving thousands out of pocket.

It’s good to see that the Department of Work and Pensions has decided to help victims of asbestos exposure trace the insurers of their former employers, the vast majority of whom have long since ceased to exist.

These diseases, a miserable and often deadly legacy of Inverclyde’s thriving industrial past, have a long latent period which means it commonly takes decades before the full effects are known and take affect.
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