At Thompson’s we would like to reassure all our clients that as far as possible we are operating as normal. The health and safety of our staff and clients is our primary concern during this outbreak and as such we are reviewing the situation on a regular basis and will be adapting our working practices following government guidelines. However, we have had to make some minor changes to how we are doing things.

Following Government guidelines, we have temporarily closed all of our offices and our staff are now all working from home using secure technologies to ensure they are able to continue to progress with existing and new cases as normal. All face to face meetings have been cancelled, however we are continuing to hold these meetings via phone and video calls. All the team are contactable on their direct dial numbers and email should you need to speak with your solicitor, please do not hesitate to talk to us about anything during this time.

We know these are uncertain and unsettling times for many of our clients, and the wider population, and things might look a little different for the foreseeable future. But our focus remains on our dedication, knowledge and strength that we provide to all our clients. We will continue to provide updates over the coming days and weeks in accordance with official guidelines and to keep everyone informed of the situation.

As always, for any concerns, advice and updates on your case; Talk to Thompsons.

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Road Traffic Claims

If anyone was visiting the west end of Glasgow last recently  I’m sure you noticed the havoc being caused by the traffic lights being off at the junction of Great Western Road and Byres Road. The lights went off following a large collision at the junction on the Friday. Unfortunately, the collision was enough to cause all of the lights to go off due to signalling faults at one of the busiest junctions in the west end.

Having swept across Gen Z, e-scooters are now navigating the quantum leap into the consciousness of the baby boomer generation. Their convenience and speed as well as lightweight practicalities mean that their use is becoming more prevalent on our roads and footpaths.

The recently quiet revolution of autonomous vehicles has led us to a junction in the road. With the already established car manufacturers such as Tesla, Volvo and Audi changing lanes into the autonomous vehicle market - such other unlikely entrants as Apple, Amazon and Samsung are also making moves in the lucrative industry. However, as with most other socially interactive technologies such as social media, there is a danger that the law could be left behind again - this time by autonomous vehicles.

This week (19th – 25th November 2018) marks Brake’s annual Road Safety Week.

Brake is the UK’s largest road safety charity. Their aim is simple; prevent accidents from happening in the first place. They work tirelessly to “raise awareness about road safety and needless deaths and injuries year-round”. Road Safety Week is utilised to raise safety awareness. Where accidents have already occurred, they provide vital support to victims of road traffic accidents.

Legal systems and processes are under almost constant review as competing interests are picked up or put to the side by different governments. In recent years a number of reforms in the UK have been framed as addressing the “compensation culture” or making the court process simpler and more efficient.  However, the reality is that some of these measures risk eroding access to justice for those with genuine injuries, rather than making the process simpler.

Last week, Mo Salah was allegedly caught texting and driving by fans when leaving Anfield following their opening season match. The footballer can be seen behind the wheel of his vehicle with his mobile phone in hand and then can be seen pulling away from a crowd of fans. This is the latest example of celebrities flouting the law when it comes to driving offences. A few weeks ago, Katie Price reported herself to the police after driving while banned. She was banned from driving in February 2018 as a result of speeding.

Barely does a week go by where a hit in run doesn’t feature in the news. For most civilised and law abiding motorists this is probably the most heinous motoring crime a person can commit. Road Traffic accidents occur every minute on UK roads. However, whilst anyone who causes an accident is likely to feel guilty and in due course there may be arguments as to who was at fault, most motorists have the decency to pull over and check for injury. For most, liability is the last thing on their mind; and the safety and wellbeing of others take the front seat.

Driving on motorways used to require a full licence. However from 4th June 2018 that is no longer the case. Learner drivers will be permitted onto motorways, as long as they are with an approved driving instructor in a dual control car. This change is part of a raft of changes of late to better prepare young drivers and reduce road traffic accidents. The number of fatal or serious accidents involving young drivers has fallen each year since 2000. However, thousands of young drivers are involved in fatal or serious road traffic collisions each year. 17-24 year olds make up 1.5% of licence holders, yet are involved in 9% of the fatal and serious road traffic accidents each year.

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