PringlesFredric John Baur – not exactly a name that rings bells. In fact, when I first read his name I was absolutely certain he was the infamous Nazi SS Guard at Sobibor death camp in occupied Poland during World War II, but that was actually Erich Bauer.

My other guess would’ve been a legendary Hungarian footballer… but that turned out to be Ferenc Puskás, and it also turned out that I’ve been eating a lot of cheese and not getting enough sleep recently.

Anyway, you may not know of Fred Baur, but you’ve doubtless had your grubby little hands on (or, more appropriately, ‘in’) one of his most popular inventions – the Pringles can.

Fred, a total boffin from Cincinnati, Ohio (which, incidentally, was the location for such ‘totes amazeballz’ films as Tango & Cash, Rain Man and Seabiscuit) patented the tubular Pringles container as well as the method of packaging the curved, stacked chips in the container in the late 1960s.

At the ripe old age of 90, Fred passed away in early May, 2008.

During his life he had requested that some of his ashes should be buried in a Pringles can at his request. Baur's children said they honored his request.

In Scotland it’s common for people to record their funeral instructions in their Wills. In practice, however, such instructions are merely expressive of a person’s wish rather than an actual, legally binding agreement between the person and their executor.

The whole subject of ownership of the human body and who has control over it after death is a thorny issue in Scotland. Ultimately, there’s no law to say either way, so in its absence, there’s a good case for detailing your funeral wishes clearly in your Will.

I would also take this opportunity to urge you to head down to your local Tesco, buy Seabiscuit on DVD, a Seabiscuit burger and a tin of Pringles (BBQ flavour, obvs.).

Pop it like it’s hot, and curse ol’ Freddie Baur for not increasing the circumference of the package so that your hand wouldn’t get stuck in there with all those delicious treats.